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Posted by Future Without Poverty On March - 20 - 2020 0 Comment

FWOP Summit in Mexico in November went well. Dayani Davilla of FWOP is working with two locations to install air monitoring in Mexico.  Spring Break sees her in Nashville helping victims of tornado.

 

Costa Rica    Our partnership with Denton Rotary has meant that the Sustainable House has been restored, that four aquaponic units have been installed and the women’s rural sustainable tourism  network has been trained in more advanced business practices. Two groups of tourists were to arrive in March.  Their first tour arrived March 8.   Some of their activities were, a tour of butterfly sanctuary, learning to make tortillas, participating in cultural and farming activities and making pottery from Costa Rican clay.  A second tour has been postponed until May 9th due to COSVID-19 outbreak.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ww59dHU3d54&feature=youtu.be

 

  1.     Harvest Initiative recently received used Southwest Airlines leather from Arise Veteran Foundation.   Local cobbers have taken the leather and produced some lovely boots. First shipment of boots will arrive by April.

http://www.harvestnic.com/ . With a median monthly income of $40,  adding  $10 – 30 per month will be an important contribution to economic wellbeing of a poor native population.

Nashville.  ARISE and FWOP are assisting residents after the tornado that recently hit Tennessee. Some 300 solar lamps that provide light and allow cell phones to be recharged have been distributed.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsYjhDnthqOmYPw1E6iuL3w

 

Tribal Impact Consortium with a focus on Opioid Abuse has been created some two years ago.  With federal funding, Meharry Medical College, UNT, Chickasaw Nation, Ottawa and  Pawnee Tribes in Oklahoma  and Spokane Tribe in Washington a plan for improving prevention, treatment and recovery programs in American Indian Communities.  ARISE Veteran Foundation and FWOP resources will play a role to expand the overall capacity of the Consortium. Thanks to our upcycling project with SWA leather some interesting partnerships are emerging across the world.  Tarkett, an international flooring company, is partnering up with Rock Construction to expand employment and vocational training in the trades, and thus indirectly expand the overall community economic wellbeing. Thus, supporting the vision and mission of FWOP to eliminate poverty by implementing more comprehensive approaches to improve community wellbeing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On March - 10 - 2020 0 Comment

FWOP Summit

Mexico City

November 21st to 23rd

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1iKbnYOYpeQJJwwOZiY0ymC1nHMq8WviB

A long story and journey!DSCF0006

In 2011, Sylvester Flores and Stan Ingman traveled to Mexico City to meet with the Director of the Women’s Network.  We were invited to meet federal governmental officials because of FWOP’s efforts in the State of Jalisco, especially the community development work in Flor de Campo some 7000 feet up in the Sierra Madre, south of Lake Chapala. According to a legend, Flor de Campo was the place ‘ God had forgot to visit’.

FWOP was invited along with COFIMICH ( Bank and Construction Company In Morelia and Renamu ( Red Nacional de Mujeres Vigilantes Contractoria Social , AC) to meet with Secretary Herberto Felix Guerra , SEDESOL ( Federal Community Development Ministry). Our main agenda was whether a ‘three for one program” could be established to support the expansion of housing program for the poor in Mexico.

The 600,000 women’ s group- RENAMU –  had been stimulated by Vincente Fox , the first PAN President Fox ( 2000- 2006),  after 70 years of rule by the PRI.  Gilberto Huitron, on the right standing, was Chief of Staff for this group. The network had held a regional meeting in Mazamitla some thirty  minutes from Flor de Campo. Some Flor de Campo women attended the meeting and the leaders of the network went to visit Flor de Campo.DSCF0003

During our history in Flor de Campo working with locals, leadership in Mazamitla and our contacts with DIF Jalisco ( Welfare for Poor Families ) progress had been made: a better road into the village was built, a link to grid electricity was installed ( $17,000 grant from US) so for the first time they had regular electricity,  a small textile factory was established with sewing machines, a small dam to allow residents  to drive to other side of the village in the rainy season,  a micro business was created to sell cold drinks,  and finally, an aquaponics tank was built by residents and UNT students allowing spring water to flow  water continuously so as to provide fresh fish for villagers. Leadership of RENAMU  were the major projects completed.    They were impressed so we got the invitation to help RENAMU secure more federal funds in partnership with FWOP to expand their impact.

The second PAN administration ( 2006-2012 ) was supportive of the network but they had their own priorities and it was not a smooth transition for the women’s network. When PRI took power in 2012, support dropped off dramatically. However the network idea did not die. The second largest union in Mexico picked up the cause.   The Confederación Revolucionaria de Obreros y Campesinos (CROC) is a Mexican trade union confederation and they back AVANZAMOS http://avanzamos.mx) and their network of some 450,000 women across Mexico. They hosted the FWOP Summit in Mexico City in 2019.

Again, as early in 2011 with the previous women’s network- RENAMU, Gilberto Huitron is a staff person for AVANZAMOS.  In 2014, he came to UNT to study English for nine months. Upon returning home he enrolled in a master’s program in Business Administration in Mexico City. Stan Ingman at UNT was asked to be the outside reader for his thesis, as his college required  one international committee member. In October 2018, he attended the Nashville FWOP Summit. At the Summit, Dr. Eliecer Vargas from Costa Rica who had hosted the 2017 FWOP Summit at CATIE (https://www.catie.ac.cr/),  and Gilberto Huitron asked to organize the next summit in Mexico City in 2019.  We enthusiastically endorsed their leadership!

Some 200 attended the 2019 FWOP Summit in Mexico City.  FWOP made a range of contributions to the event.  First, Dayani Davilla from UNT FWOP demonstrated the air monitoring devices under the banner of citizen science and STEM education for youth in schools. In addition, she showed  how this can be linked to mapping of locations.  She had participants moving around Mexico City taking PM 2.5 particulate readings of air quality.

See photo of Summit participants taking reading  around Mexico City.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/xf8tY1VqktnC3mek7

Dayani Davilla has two locations in Mexico to set up pilot monitoring sites. Further training will start in 2020.

FWOP member Margaret Bates from Houston introduced a simple way to improve breathing for individuals with COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) using harmonicas.  Follow-up sessions in Mexico are being scheduled in 2020.

https://www.copdfoundation.org/What-is-COPD/Understanding-COPD/What-is-COPD.aspx.

Dayani Davilla also introduced our FWOP solar lamp program. Lamps are useful when grid electricity goes down and you need light,  and to recharge your cell phone.  Micro businesses to sell lamps is next step in coming year.  Some lamps will go down to Mexico in December to start a pilot project.

Some discussion about a possible on-line store started and we will explore various models in 2020.   An FWOP partner in Guadalajara came up with a surprise. Biobenefits, AC made a contribution of 2000 lbs. of toys to FWOP, and we quickly donated them to AVANZAMOS.

https://www.facebook.com/473499082723868/posts/2506575016082921/?sfnsn=scwspmo

Conclusion:

We hope to expand our partnership with AZANZAMOS IN 2020!  Regional workshop at the Tepehua Centro in Chapala in March is one idea.  FWOP, local Rotary Clubs  and regional leadership from AZAMZAMOS could meet to share ideas for the expansion of educational and entrepreneurial programming. A tour of the Tepehua Centro and sustainable-oriented farm on Lake Chapala operated by the SuBire school  ( www.subire.com )  are two possible tours. Centro has an interesting clean stove program to improve health of residents and many health programs to review.

 

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On March - 12 - 2019 0 Comment

DIY Air Monitoring Education for a Cleaner Environment

image

The University of North Texas, UNT, and Future Without Poverty, Inc., FWOP, are partnering to provide a series of STEM and Public Health workshops. During a 2 to 3‐hour hands‐on session we will show students how to build a simple particulate matter (PM) monitor with parts you can buy online and easily connect to a system of monitors in operation around the world (luftdaten). These workshops are designed to engage students in

science and engineering topics while educating our community about the environment and public health.

The workshops are structured with a flexible curriculum that can engage students at all levels and provides many avenues to introduce STEM and public health topics. Wherever a workshop is conducted, we will attempt to establish a single monitor and the remaining

monitors will be given to the students to install in their communities. Any monitors that are built but not installed will be donated to other areas of the world where significant air quality challenges persist.

The primary goals of these workshops are:

  1. Introduce STEM and Public Health topics to underserved and underrepresented communities,
  2. Educate the community about the impact of air quality on health and the environment at both local and global scales,
  3. Establish a network of PM monitors at home and abroad that will provide both a community alert system and a wealth of data for further research, and
  4. Have some fun!

This project will be conducted by Constant Marks, a PhD. student in Mechanical and Energy Engineering at UNT, with the help of two undergraduate students and a high school student. The work will be overseen by Prof. Stan Ingman, a Professor of Applied Gerontology, Editor of Sustainable Communities Review and Vice President of FWOP (www.fwop.org).

Several interested parties including the Dallas ISD, Frisco ISD, and Denton ISD, as well as various youth programs in Nashville and St Louis and the CATIE institute in Costa Rica have already been identified and are eager to bring these workshops to their students. We have also contacted a network of other researchers, civic organizations, and NGOs, who would like to be involved in this project at various capacities. These workshops are the initial phase of larger project that will be proposed for NSF funding in the fall.

PM Monitor Assembly Outline

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The assembly of the PM monitor is designed so that anyone can do it. With only 7 wires and 2 cable ties, the kit becomes a Wi‐Fi connected PM monitoring station. A photo of the partially assembled monitor is shown below.

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PM Monitoring Station

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The parts are sourced from AliExpress and Amazon. A group in Stuttgart (www.lufdaten.info) have programmed the firmware that will be installed on the PM monitors and hosts the servers that store the data. Part of the workshop will include teaching students how to connect and install firmware onto the monitor’s microcontroller (NodeMCU) and connecting the devices to the Luftdaten API. The microcontroller is based around the popular Arduino platforms and some of the more advanced modules will include programming in the Arduino IDE.

To assemble the monitors a PM sensor (SDS011) and a temperature and humidity sensor (DHT22) are connected to the NodeMCU. After wiring, the components are secured with cable ties and installed into the housing made from two PVC pipe fittings. Next we configure the stations Wi‐Fi, and then the sensor can be ‘tested’ after about 10 minutes on the lufdaten.info website.

Finally, to make the PM monitors a permanent part of the network, we send some site specific information to lufdaten.info. We will send the students an email with their sensor ID, once the sensor are installed and integrated into the Lufdaten network.

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On March - 5 - 2014 0 Comment
Colegio01

Colegio Union Mexico ( www.colegiounionmexico.com) is a K-12 school in the Los Molinos subdivision, Zapopan, Jalisco – North West Guadalajara Metro Area. Established as a K – 9 school in 2012, by the next year, 2013, it added the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades. On December 16th the FWOP team visited, experiencing a very dynamic day, to say the least!

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On January - 19 - 2014 0 Comment
Tepehua Community Center – side street view

Our FWOP team visited Moonyeen King, the foreign retirees and the families at the poor hillside barrio of Tepehua in Chapala, Jalisco, Mexico. The relatively new Center ( www.tepehua.org) provided Christmas lunch for some 500 children on December 20th, 2013.

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On November - 16 - 2013 0 Comment
Munsingen, Canton Bern, November, 2013.

Numerous reports mention the possible elimination of extreme poverty in the world in the near future. At the same time, reports show that the percentage of people under the poverty level has risen from 18% to 22% in the last several years in the USA.
The recent mayor’s election in New York City focused upon the gap between rich and the rest of the New Yorkers that has been increasing, and some wonder if the middle class in the USA will continue to decline further. The Econonmist ( September 21, 2013; p12 ) noted : “ Americans’ income inequality is growing again. Time to cut subsidies to the rich and invest in the young.” Median household income has dropped from $56,000 in 2007 to under $52,000. Implication? Both conservatives and liberal agree this is the most fundamental political issue in the upcoming elections. Debate will be what to do about it?
“The gap in test scores between rich and poor children is 30-40 wider than it was 25 years ago.” The Economist article suggests a focus on early childhood education and more progressive taxes. With the tax code favoring the middle and upper classes, the Economist favors a flat tax. Details on this proposal would be important to follow carefully.

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On October - 2 - 2013 0 Comment

[Email Transcript]

Subject: FWOP

Dr. Preston,

First off, I want to thank you for the recommendation letter you submitted for me a while back.  I just wanted to let you know that I have been granted admission in the the University of Kentucky’s Physician Assistant program, and I have accepted the position.

The program starts the first week of January.  Therefore, I will not be able to participate in FWOP as president of the UC chapter.  I was wondering if there was any way that I could still be involved in FWOP.  I know that you had mentioned that it was possible.  I really feel that just being affiliated with FWOP and being able to talk about the things that the organization was doing solidified my entrance into the UK PA program.

I had spoken with Kirsten about a month ago about ideas to move FWOP forward.  But now that I’m going to be leaving I obviously will not be able to follow through with those.

The part of the program that I will be apart of is actually located in Morehead, KY as a partnership with UK and Morehead State.  The Morehead portion is focused on underserved areas of the population and I would be allowed two internships outside of the country for that purpose.  That’s probably the biggest reason that I feel FWOP was on my side in the interview process.

Let me know if there is anything that I could be apart of, or if I could be involved in spreading FWOP to Morehead/UK.

Thanks again,
Cody Kirschner

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On September - 5 - 2013 0 Comment
Doc Preston Pic

BATAVIA, OH (September 5, 2013) – A Future Without Poverty announced Michael “Doc” Preston, Assistant Professor of Biology at UC Clermont College, as the Future Without Poverty’s Breaking the Myth of No Effect 2013 Award recipient. A Future Without Poverty is an international volunteer run non-profit organization founded in 1995 that encourages individuals to make a difference by breaking the cycle of poverty. ….[more]

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On September - 1 - 2013 0 Comment
VeteransITCenter1

A Future Without Poverty – Veteran Housing in St Louis: Preventing Homelessness and Promoting Human Development – A private company called Anthem USA, LLC has the following vision: To create new models of sustainable supportive environments for at risk populations by innovation and collaboration with other organizations. It’s mission is to create and integrate veteran-centric housing opportunities with supportive services that assist with the effects of prior deployment and facilitate ……[more]

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On February - 14 - 2013 0 Comment
fire

A Future Without Poverty- What if God were listening… This past summer I tried to walk a mile in their shoes, the homeless shoes. The drive to do this was because the feelings that use to surge through me whenever someone would stop by our migrant camp has never left me.

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