Posted by Miguel Juanez On September - 29 - 2016 0 Comment

Frisco, Texas —   FWOP Associate and RecruiterGreat job, Mr. Marsh! , John Marsh works at McDonald’s recruits FWOP affiliates and members in Texas and in our region. He recently received an Award for his outstanding work at McDonald’s in Frisco. Mr. Marsh is considered a role model for his focus on quality, service and cleanliness, the company noted in a news release. “John works the drive-thru and has a smile and a kind word for everyone.”

Great job! John, thank you for doing such an excellent service in representing FWOP and McDonald’s well. Keep it up!

Uganda FWOP

Some four years ago four solar lamps were overview-of-fwop-network-1distributed to four single mothers or grandmothers with children to open the door to Uganda. In 2014, Ishmaels Kabann Kahanaukye, founder of Uganda FWOP Chapter,  distributed 40 solar lamps in western Uganda  to senior citizens. Recently 400 solar lamps were distributed by FWOP Uganda. Picture below shows how difficult it was to visit the remote villages in western Uganda near the Rwanda and Tanzania border.

Here is the Presidentoverview-of-fwop-network-3 of Uganda FWOP (Ishmaels Kabann Kabanaukye) wearing a blue jacket. He was providing an explanation of how the lamps operate, how students can save money, energy, how they be able to do their homework, and how they do less harm to the planet by avoiding kerosene, a bio-carbon source of energy.

Jakarta , Indonesia

In Jakarta, XSProject, with support from the UNT FWOP affiliateoverview-of-fwop-network-4distributed  21 portable solar lamps to the middle and high school students living at the Cirendeu trash picker community. XSProject is  currently raising funds for a second order of 55 more solar lamps to distribute to the elementary school students. The students not only use their lamps for studying, but also for safety when they are walking home in the dark.  If you would like to donate to this project you can do so by clicking here

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On December - 3 - 2015 0 Comment

Nigeria

Amanda Sunny, MPH,  Director, Exquisite Water, Inc. and Whitney Carr, Vice President of UNT FWOP Chapter and on the advisory board of Exquisite Water, Inc. recently returned from water testing in three villages in the State of Anambra, Nigeria. Two water treatment systems were also tested Rorus and Cascade Designs. They are going back to more testing in dry season and begin to implement an intervention in one village.  They have a fundraiser on crowdrise for their organization. Link to fundraiser: www.crowdrise.com/exquisitewater

Mexico – GuadalajaraColegio Union Mexico, affiliate of FWOP

In October twenty-eight students from Colegio Union Mexico (K- 12)  in Guadalajara arrived in Denton for a week at Camp Compass. Program included field trips in museums in Dallas and Fort Worth, a tour of zero net energy lab house at UNT, afternoon on organic dyeing of fabric, and an afternoon on recycling, waste water treatment, and methane gas for electricity at Denton Water-Recycling-Solid Waste complexes. Rotary and FWOP members had great dinner with these working class middle and high school students one evening while they were in town. We believe the students at CUM may start a solar cooperative at their school.

To see the visit to Bettye Myers Middle school in Denton, click here: www.realmyersfc.wix.com/titans#!cum-visit/c1syt They visited class rooms and attended the soccer practice of a special program designed to reduce dropout rates from schools in Denton ISD. The program is entitled GOAL, it mixes soccer with mentoring and community service.

Ivory Coastivory Coast and UNT FWOP Teams

UNT FWOP and Ivory Coast FWOP hosted its first benefit dinner to support the establishment of two  solar lamp cooperatives in Ivory Coast in December.  One location is in the western mountain village and another will be in Abidjan, the Capital.

 

St Louis, MOAnthem USA Empowering the HomelessArbor Health Management

Anthem USA took over some six months ago Arbor Health for  veterans with mental  health and addiction challenges.  On Veteran’s Day they decided to look for homeless veterans and by weeks end two new veterans were moved into Arbor Health and take off the streets of St Louis.

Mexico – TepheuaTepehua's OB/GYN ClinicOB/Gyn Mobile Clinic

The Tepehua Centro in Chapala (operated by retirees and volunteers from barrio and region) is completing the OB/GYN clinic at the Centro soon  and they have a new van for their OB/GYN mobile clinic program that goes to other poor barrio near Chapala around Lake Chapala  area, southeast of Guadalajara. (www.tepehua.org)

Costa Rica

UNT FWOP and FWOP leadership met with the Co-Directors of Sustainable Tourism (Dr. Dan Spears and Eliecer Vargas)  and the newly formed FWOP Graduate Student Chapter officers. We discussed their goals in Texas and in Costa Rica. We also began to explore if we may hold the 2017 Summit at university in Cartago, Costa Rica (Solutions for Environment and Development – CATIE – www.catie.ac.cr). We will keep you posted.

Ugandan FWOP MembersUganda

The newly formed Uganda FWOP chapter recently passed out some 40 solar lamps to senior citizens in western Uganda. FWOP will work with this Uganda FWOP Chapter and CHC Foundation Limited to establish a solar cooperative in the coming months. Ishmaels Kabanukye, Chair of  Uganda FWOP Chapter is initially strongly focused  on poverty among elders in Uganda .   In the 16th of October,  he was elected as Chairman of Uganda Association of Gerontology and Geriatric Association. See photo above. This will provide a good foundation for FWOP to expand its impact in Uganda.

More details on our partnerships on the next round!

-Miguel Juanez

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On May - 4 - 2015 0 Comment

Emily Medina, President of the University of North Texas (UNT) chapter of A Future Without Poverty (FWOP), and Stan Ingman, Vice President of the FWOP Board, attended a conference titled, “Education and Culture: Cross-Border Challenges and Opportunities” this past May 1st.  This conference is one of many initiatives made possible by an MOU signed back in 2001 between the university and Secretary of Education of Jalisco, Mexico.

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On May - 1 - 2015 0 Comment

Some thirty thousand retirees have settled on the north side of Lake Chapala, south of Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico.  They come from Europe, Canada, USA and it is claimed that their economic impact on the area is more important than all the agricultural production from Mexico City to Guadalajara.  As they attempt to design a meaningful retirement, many become community development activists in the surrounding municipalities of Lake Chapala, Ajijic and Jocotepec.  The Ajijic Rotary Club and related organizations come together to raise funds.  The Tepehua Centro, which is a barrio north of Chapala, is the focus of some significant development efforts.  A small team from the Denton Rotary club visited them in October and in April to assess what might be the next steps to support the effort in the Tepehua Centro.  Rotary Clubs in Denton, Arlington and Flower Mound provided $5000 for pharmacy supplies in April 2015.  Future Without Poverty (FWOP) students at the University of North Texas( UNT) chapter provided $500 to repair one house in the barrio in 2014.  

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On August - 29 - 2014 0 Comment

An indirect route to build more sustainable communities through schools, is the thesis or question. Two of our partner schools in Guadalajara, Mexico are working to address this issue and build better communities. (www.SuBire.mx and www.colegiounionmexico.com ) One of those schools is SuBire, who in the last few years has demonstrated to parents and students how to create an “energy efficient” school–or by implication– energy efficient homes and businesses.

Solar panels atop subire

In 2013, they installed one hundred 250 watt solar panels, furthermore they installed another 100 panels in 2014 over the school’s parking lot. They estimate that 25% of the $5,000 monthly bill will be covered by solar power and that the system should be paid off in five years.

Solar panels atop school

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