Posted by Miguel Juanez On May - 4 - 2015 0 Comment

Emily Medina, President of the University of North Texas (UNT) chapter of A Future Without Poverty (FWOP), and Stan Ingman, Vice President of the FWOP Board, attended a conference titled, “Education and Culture: Cross-Border Challenges and Opportunities” this past May 1st.  This conference is one of many initiatives made possible by an MOU signed back in 2001 between the university and Secretary of Education of Jalisco, Mexico.

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On January - 11 - 2015 0 Comment

Recently a team, Kathy Langley, Nichola Driver, Iftekhar Amin and Stan Ingman traveled to Guadalajara Mexico. With partners in Mexico, some significant poverty reduction programs were visited. In additions, we visited educational efforts that show students how sustainability planning can promote poverty reduction and some future plans emerged on the trip for future partnerships.

Our team visited CUM ( www.colegiounionmexico.com ) a K to 12 school in northwest Guadalajara. Families who send their children have incomes that range from $1000 to 2000 per month and pay under $180 per month for their children to attend CUM. We conducted a focus group with the parents to explore how they could develop their neighborhoods to support more sustainable living (socially, economically and environmentally). We made plans for a second community survey on needs and planning; the new survey will be sent out in 2015. Below was performance on October 31, 2014 for Day of the Dead on November 1st. All memorials for the Day of the Dead were done with recycled materials.

performance at campus!

performance at campus!

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On October - 31 - 2014 0 Comment

POVERTY, CORRUPTION AND SUSTAINABILITY: EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABILITY

By Stan Ingman, PhD.

Introduction

When we review the challenges we all face around the globe, we can identify at least three major issues to be addressed in the 21st Century: Poverty, Corruption and Sustainability. Some call for retreat into “gated” neighborhoods or national borders. With our dependence on energy and consumption of products to live from around the world, total isolation or independence is not likely to be a functional strategy for survival. It seems clear that few borders function very well. Witness how porous the USA/ Mexico, or the Africa/ Europe borders are to prevent immigration. Gated communities in Mexico and USA may reduce kidnapping and violent attacks of the elites, but elites do not like to avoid contact with the rest of the world and it is not a possible solution for 90% of the population.

As we see locally some upper class families from Mexico, Africa, Asia, Middle East, Russia, China, Central America and South America are moving to USA or Europe to protect their families and themselves. To avoid China, Mexico or other nations, you can buy your way into USA for some $50,000. Cities like Dallas send officials to various cities of Mexico attempting to attract Mexican citizens to come north as an economic development strategy for Dallas. Attracting foreigners to St Louis is a strategy to build up their economy. Chinese nationals have used 85% of the 10,667 visas under the US program. (Shyong, 2014 )

This essay attempts to argue that there are few short term solutions to reducing this poverty and corruption, which in turn, would reduce terrorism, violence and difficult migration across national borders. Most indexes seem to indicate an increase in the side effects of poverty and corruption around the world. The World Fact Book published by the Central Intelligence Agency reports that terrorism has been increasing every year since 2001. (www.indexmundi.com) Huffington Post reports terrorism attacks have more than quadrupled since 2001.

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On August - 29 - 2014 0 Comment

An indirect route to build more sustainable communities through schools, is the thesis or question. Two of our partner schools in Guadalajara, Mexico are working to address this issue and build better communities. (www.SuBire.mx and www.colegiounionmexico.com ) One of those schools is SuBire, who in the last few years has demonstrated to parents and students how to create an “energy efficient” school–or by implication– energy efficient homes and businesses.

Solar panels atop subire

In 2013, they installed one hundred 250 watt solar panels, furthermore they installed another 100 panels in 2014 over the school’s parking lot. They estimate that 25% of the $5,000 monthly bill will be covered by solar power and that the system should be paid off in five years.

Solar panels atop school

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