Posted by Miguel Juanez On February - 28 - 2017 0 Comment

Get ready for another opportunity to attend FWOP’s meeting of the minds at our summit in  Costa Rica at CATIE October 4th – 6th

If you’d like to present what your organization is doing to fight poverty, please email Dr. Stan Ingman here with details about your presentation. Drop us a note of your ideas. More detail coming soon on our FWOP Facebook

Arbor Health, St Louis

Arbor Health had a visit from the Priory of St. Louis Veterans Group, who prepared a holiday meal for the residents of Arbor Health. The Arbor Health Foundation, a non-profit, has moved its assets to new organization, entitled Arise Veteran Foundation, so that their work can expand to encompass the broader community of veterans

Recently, FWOP started working with Southwest Airlines to recycle leather seats.  This partnership has helped to create new employment options and craft projects for the residents of Arbor Health. Always Green Recycling based in St. Louis has stepped up to join FWOP to employ residents of Arbor Health (http://www.recyclingcenterstlouis.com/). Three veterans are being trained to be locksmiths (http://www.locksmithofstlouis.com/) and one resident now has a new position as a locksmith.

Zach (MA -Chicago Art Institute) is assisting veterans at Arbor Health to do art work and Yameng (UNT-MS in Applied Gerontology) is expanding menu options and assisting with management. Zach is helping veterans create various products from the used Southwest Airline leather.

In the picture to the right, Zach and his veteran clients at Arbor Health Fund held their first art exhibit.  The leaded and beveled windows that were donated (recycled glass) to the facility and turned into painted stain glass creations.

AWOWNOW, Ghana

AWOWNOW has a school for girls in northeast Ghana. The girls are producing many items such as shoes, bags, dresses, etc. to be sold sustainably in markets. To learn more about this initiative, visit www.awownow.org

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On October - 27 - 2016 0 Comment

Southwest Airlines and FWOP Cooperate : Recycling to expand human development

Thanks to Southwest Airlines, our first effort is focused on recycling the old leather seats of airplanes. Some dozen sites in Texas, Missouri and Virginia are exploring how the discarded leather can be used  and “upcycled”, that is, create new uses for the leather.

A middle school in Dallas, the Advanced Technical Center in Denton, the UNT Fiber Collective, an arts program in Dallas, a private women’s bag company in Dallas, a 4 H Center in Virginia, and finally, Arbor Health rehabilitation with many veterans in St. Louis have so far agreed to cooperate.

Arbor Health with its strong art therapy focus and the garden program in partnership with Home Depot and Monsanto has been working with glass, murals, leather and metal to create products designed  by veterans and others. Printing 4 Vets is  a small business created to provide some jobs for residents at Arbor Health.  Recently the residents  started  to create wallets out of leather. As you can imagine, they were very excited to receive used leather from Southwest Airlines.

A retired Marine has joined Arbor Health team to expand the initial initiative. He is the founder of Always Green Recycling whose goal is to hire residents, help them gain independence, and hold down a job.  He has agreed to store the leather seats and recycle the foam and other bi-products from the seats — approximately 26 pallets of leather– once they are shipped to St. Louis later this month (October).

Always Green

Their plan is to break the seats down into workable pieces, then distribute them to other FWOP affiliates,  keeping  some for their artwork,  and using some for re-purposed leather goods that can be sold.

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On August - 19 - 2016 0 Comment

Global warming has raised global sea level about 8 inches since 1880, and the rate of rise is accelerating. Rising seas dramatically increase the odds of damaging floods from storm surges. A Climate Central analysis finds the odds of “100-year” or worse floods occurring by 2030 are on track to double or more, over widespread areas of the U.S.

Across the country, nearly 5 million people live in 2.6 million homes at less than 4 feet above high tide — a level lower than the century flood line for most locations analyzed. And compounding this risk, scientists expect roughly 2 to 7 more feet of sea level rise this century — a lot depending upon how much more heat-trapping pollution humanity puts into the sky.

Miami and St. Petersburg, Florida, New York City, various Islands across the worlds oceans, Holland, Bangladesh and many other places are seriously considering what should be their strategies to adjust to rising seas. All the while, debates between scientists and climate deniers continues in the background [source].

On a personal note, in 1963, I was a volunteer (one month training in engineering with degrees in botany and rural sociology) with the International Voluntary Service. I entered in a partnership with USAID, Social Conservation Service and the Algerian Forestry Service.

The newly formed government challenged my team and I to stop the Sahara Desert from moving farther north, that is, stop the desertification of northern Algeria. As a 26 year old at the time, an optimist, I thought about the request and wondered what steps could be initiated to stop the desertification process from the base in Tlemcen, Algeria. We planted some 30 thousand trees with 3000 Algerian refugees from the civil war per year. Unfortunately, because of the military takeover of the government, the project lasted only 3 years.

Slowing down climate change by moving to a non-carbon economy would appear to be necessary. It does seem adjusting to forced relocation of coastal populations around the world will need to be addressed, regardless. Recently the Financial Times reported that in the last five years, renewable energy use has jumped 70%, a good shift away from fossil fuels. (August 14, 2016). Some good news, but fossil fuels still dominate the energy sector.

Let us focus on Louisiana and the struggles of the Biloxi Chitimacha Choctaw band.

Plenty International is working with Biloxi Chitimacha Choctaw band. As the Gulf of Mexico is rising, the water is slowly eroding the coastal land. See snapshot from Rebecca Ferris’s documentary “Can’t Stop the Water” below.

Sea Level Rising

They have also been involved in the BP oil disaster which happened in the waters where the Choctaw live and fish. They were also exposed to millions of gallons of high levels of toxic dispersants that were sprayed to sink the oil.

Plenty International has been working with this tribe since Hurricane’s Katrina and Rita in 2005.

Rebecca Ferris’s documentary “Can’t Stop the Water”, a 30-minute film, does an excellent job telling the story of the Island Tribe and all that they are up against with the rising waters and exposure to hurricanes. The film can be purchased for $4.99 as a one-time rental or for $10.99 to buy as a download for continuous watching. Click here to visit the website for more information.

climatechange-post-3 climatechange-post-2 climatechange-post-4

Isle de Jean Charles is one Island that is sinking quickly and the people  on the island have been granted federal funding to move inland to higher ground.

Pointe-Aux-Chenes is on a peninsula experiencing flooding also and is stable at the moment but eventually will have to confront similar issues as the water continues to rise.

Two other locations to review the impact of climate change are the Chesapeake Bay, where islands have vanished due to rising sea levels and where other are being reduced in size. [Source]

The other location is the coast of Florida, where anti-climate change ideology is dominating the legislature in Florida. As a result, many Mayors of Florida’s coastal cities do not find much support for discussions on how the state can assist them. However, the shift from anti-climate change to climate change positions undertaken by costal Mayors indicates the seriousness of the matter.

All of this goes back to the title of the post. Are we experiencing an ecocide?

Jared Diamond (2005) in his book, Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail and Succeed, points to many reasons why societies decline and die historically, not all by “ecocide”. He writes about five major factors:

  1. climate change
  2. hostile neighbors
  3. collapse of friendly trade partners
  4. environmental damage
  5. society’s response to its environmental problems.

Climate change may or may not be slowed down.

Are the US and the world going to respond with wise choices and action? Or not?

Perhaps in some small way, the FWOP network can support Plenty International as it assists the Biloxi Chitimacha Choctaw band on the Southern Louisiana Coast adjust to relocation and climate change. The time is now.

 

Stan Ingman, PhD. University of North Texas 

 

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On June - 19 - 2016 0 Comment

Updates from India, Indonesia, Ivory Coast, Uganda and Nicaragua

Our new affiliates and new FWOP Chapters are moving forward toward sustainability in many different ways.  ‘Creative interdependency’ may be a good moto for the link between FWOP and our network. Empowerment local initiative, Enterprise development, Education for youth, and Environmental clean-up and preservation  need to converge to promote sustainability  for children, widows, young women, trash pickers, elders, and the poorest among us.

Nasik, State of Maharashtra, India

A-WOW (www.awownow.org) is focused on girl and women empowerment in nine countries. Recently, the Founder and CEO  of AWOW, Carolyn Wright,  was in India opening up a store in Nasik to market quilts and other products produced by widows in rural areas of the State of Maharashtra.

 

AWOW also  conducts a Global Young Women Leader -Summit  for women 18 to 24 years old in Dallas on July  24th to August 4th.  One or more young women managing the store will attend.  Planning is moving forward to establish an on-line store to market the quilts as well as items from Mexico, Indonesia  and other locations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indonesia – Trash Pickers Create New Business Options and Schools for Their Children

XSProject.org ( http://xsproject-usa.org/  )  based in Denton and in Jakarta.   There are some 450,000 trash pickers living in communities in a city of 13 million.  In addition to creating schools, they are working on clean water projects to improve their family health.  Solar Lamps from FWOP solar initiative will arrive in Jakarta in May to see how they may assist children to study in the evening. 

Below is a statement of XSProject ‘s Mission, and a photo of the school they have established for the children .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 19 post4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above is photo of the water project XSProject has created by selling items created from trash.

Ivory Coast FWOP New Chapter on the Move!

Ms. Marie Coulibaly, President Ivory Coast FWOP, will soon travel home from Denton.  Her team received twenty solar lamps some months ago to establish a pilot project in the Capital of Ivory Coast , Abidjan and in a village in the western mountains of Ivory Coast .  Recently, they distributed four lamps in Abidjan to experiment and see how best to establish solar lamps enterprises.   Some NGOs have exploited people and trust in Abidjan is weak.  Marie’s team has a group of young women ready to move forward. The solar charger for cell phones may suit urban Abidjan better.   The four families who received lamps are becoming FWOP-solar lamp sales persons and promoters!

 

 

 

 

 

Photo of Family in Abidjan receiving a solar lamp from Ivory Coast FWOP team

Uganda FWOP

Some six months ago, the President of Uganda FWOP, Kabann Ishmaels distributed 40  lamps in western Uganda.  An affiliate of Uganda FWOP and FWOP, “ RUDEP” , in the Ntungamo District in western Uganda  supplied funds for  400 solar chargers to power up cell phones.  In April, these lamps will be handed out.

In 2012,  UNTFWOP students distributed solar lamps to four single mothers with children.

Single Mother in Uganda with five children  receiving a solar lamp in 2012

 

Nicaragua – Educational Center Goes Solar!   

Harvest Initiative  is a faith-based affiliate in Nicaragua focusing on education and community development.  Field personnel from HI provided design and installation services for Opportunity International’s upscale Pacaya Lodge and Spa.  The 20 kilowatt grid tied systems will provide energy for the 26 room eco lodge where students enrolled in sustainable tourism curriculum at the nearby Entrepreneurial High School will get hands-on experience in a working five star hotel.  Harvest Initiative is pleased to have been involved with this major effort in asset based community development. Long term, 10% of the profit from the lodge will be directed to sustain that Entrepreneurial School.

Recently their partner built an upscale Eco-Resort, 20 minutes from The Colonial Town of Granada .  Some 10% of the profits will benefit local projects that the Harvest Initiative support in education and in community development.

 

 

Education: The need for education in Nicaragua is overwhelming. 35% of all school age children are not in school. There are many reasons for this staggering reality.  To meet that need  Harvest  is dedicating a large amount of time and resources toward primary and secondary education.  The Christian schools founded and operated by their mission have grown from one school in 1999 with 15 children to three schools with a combined registration of 780 students.

Because the schools are located in very poor neighborhoods they are also centers of safety from violence and thus, the school is a place for the children to learn. Often the children come from very poor and even violent home situations.

At the San Benito school alone this year, two families with five of their students have had parents murdered,  leaving the children in the care of neighbors and grandparents.  In these critical situations the concerns of the staff at the school goes beyond education, and thus, the school attempts to provide food and medical assistance.

Community Development: Unemployment in Nicaragua is around 35%. This country abounds in resources but ignorance, greed, political division and lack of vision condemn a vast majority of Nicaraguan to subsistence living. In the cities this results in all the problems that drugs and gangs engender.

In the rural areas land disputes, alcoholism, and family strife bring misery to many. To address these realities,  Harvest undertakes community development projects to help communities organize to remove obstacles to the use of their own resources.  A community must become good stewards of what they have before they can wisely use help from outside.

One of the largest ongoing projects currently is the distribution of food under a program – Kids Against Hunger. Their team deliver 48,000 meals each month to 25 different ministries.  Local churches, schools, and feeding centers with Nicaraguan volunteers prepare and serve the food to an estimated 3200 of the neediest children and elderly.

Over the years they have completed 12 water projects benefiting over 3000 people in 10 communities.  Small business seed money is another development activity. This can be a loan of seeds and fertilizer to farmers or Valeria Lopez’s work in Managua with a ten member sewing cooperative. The cooperative pays decent wages to women, many of whom can no longer sew fast enough to meet the quotas demanded in the sweatshop factories that ring the capital.

Drawing on the strengths of their team, over the years they have worked also in bio-gas and wind energy, boat building, machinery importation.

Harvest is also working on the Atlantic Coast tribal area that covers to 19 communities along the Prinzapolka River Basin in Eastern Nicaragua . The area’s 22,000 inhabitants and  comprise Nicaragua’s poorest district.  The majority of the tribes-people live barely above a subsistence level.

Two special initiatives in the region need to be mentioned:  Cleft palate surgeries improving childrens lives! And Teaching computer skills for a better a life!

 

 

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On May - 27 - 2016 0 Comment

UNTFWOP CHAPTER: 2015-2016 ACADEMIC YEAR

SUMMARY OF MAJOR PROGRAMS AND PROGRESS

Solar Initiative

UNTFWOP in Denton took the lead to kick off the solar initiative in partnership with Ivory Coast FWOP Chapter. They raised funds to send the first twenty lamps to be sent to Ivory Coast.  There are two major locations initially: poor neighborhoods in Abidjan and a village in western rural mountains of Ivory Coast.

The President of Ivory Coast FWOP Chapter,  Apatio Marie-France Coulibaly, will visit Ivory Coast in June and take solar cell phone charger to Abidjan and explore how the market with respond to the more advanced model.  In April at the summit, a plan emerged to send 400 solar cell phone chargers to Ivory Coast in next 6 months.

In the village in western Ivory Coast there is an issue of water quality, so a new chlorination machine powered by a car battery will be introduced and evaluated.  Solar lamps with cell phone and tablet charging docks will also be introduced and evaluated on how they can be best incorporated into the community.

The solar lamps have begun to replace the use of kerosene lamps, and have improved the lives of people living in the Ivory Coast in many ways. There is now increased safety for women walking at night, less risk of health problems from breathing in kerosene fumes, a decreased risk of house fires, and reduced monthly spending for owners of solar lights due to the fact that they no longer need to purchase kerosene.

Sustainability and Poverty Reduction Pre-summit

UNTFWOP partnered with Masters in International Sustainable Tourism (MIST) Graduate students to host an international conference at UNT, April 21st to 23rd. The planning committee used the registration fees and outside support to fund the solar initiative. College of Public Affairs and Community Services and International Studies Program donated $400 to cover food and space rental.  Some $2000 was raised to support the solar initiative. Hillwood Communities, a Perot Company, at the Harvest Property south of Denton provided lunch to attendees on April 22nd.

Visitors and presenters representing Ohio, Virginia, Ghana, Kenya, Uganda, Costa Rica, Mexico, Indonesia, and India participated in Summit.

Initial plans for the International Summit in Costa Rica at the CATIE (http://www.catie.ac.cr/en/)   in 2017 were made.

Creating Partnership With MIST Graduate Students

The Sustainable Tourism graduate students spend their first year at UNT and second year at CATIE in Costa Rica.  Graduate students, after watching the UNTFWOP chapter operation, decided to support the undergraduate chapter and not create their own chapter of FWOP.  With MIST graduate students strong fund raising ability, this should help us in 2016-17.  In September we will meet the new MIST Graduate Students and attempt to forge a stronger partnership.

Fund Raising Innovation

During almost every week of the 2015-2016 academic year, the UNTFWOP chapter gave away popcorn to UNT students, faculty, and staff, while asking for donations for their projects and educating passersby about the mission and projects of the organization. These events on the Library Mall at UNT was a major success and innovation, thanks to UNTFWOP officer Jonathan Roosa.  Besides being a wonderful system to raise funds, it did two additional things. First, it was a great way to recruit new members. Second, it was a solid way to educate students on campus and expand awareness about FWOP chapter activities in USA and abroad.

UNTFWOP is planning on continuing this in the 2016-2017 academic year.

Clean Stove Initiative

In the barrio Tepehua in the city of Chapala, Mexico, many households are burning wood to cook on open fires in their homes.  Respiratory diseases is one result, as well as an increased risk of house fire.     UNTFWOP, working with Corazon de la Tierra in Mexico, decided to fund one or more clean stoves to improve the health of local family members. Based upon local fund raising, we plan to fund the first stove this summer.

Rekindling the Garden Project

With support from Home Depot this year, the chapter has launched a community garden at the Renaissance Courts Apartments, a low income housing project in southeast Denton.  Three raised beds were built and some plants were initially installed in spring of 2015, and replanting occurred in fall of 2015 and spring of 2016.  After some struggle, some residents are beginning to take ownership of the garden and take care of it on their own.

We also attempted to assist Bettye Myers Middle School (where UNTFWOP has previously established the GOALS program) to create a community garden at the school.  A teacher from the school was able to make a presentation at the conference.  We have some hope we can kick off the garden in the fall.

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On April - 20 - 2016 0 Comment

Future Without Poverty’s (FWOP) 2016 Conference on Reducing Global Poverty Through

Grassroots Sustainable Actions will be held at the campus of the University of North

Texas in Denton April 21 -23.

 

This conference is being designed to bring together local

entrepreneurs that will share their successes and vision for a future without poverty

based on local business models that are economically and environmentally sustainable.

FWOP expects participation from its global network of 50 affiliates representing 25

countries through the use of skype conferencing for those unable to attend in person.

FWOP anticipates representatives from over 10 countries to be at the conference.

The objective of the conference is to exchange ideas, projects and to expand our

growing global network for a future without poverty. This is a hands-on-working

conference that will help plan for future projects for FWOP and to set the agenda for the

2017 Summit of the Global Coalition for a Future Without Poverty to be held in Costa

Rica.

 

At the conference FWOP will be unveiling its campaign to establish solar cooperatives

as part of its Solar KO Poverty project. This project already has interest from affiliates in

6 countries to pilot the project in its first stage. The goal is to distribute 1,000,000 solar

lights by 2019. FWOP affiliates from Africa, North America, South America, Europe and

Asia will be sharing their inspiring stories about education, micro businesses, water,

agriculture and energy projects that are already working or a part of their vision for a

future without poverty.

 

A Future Without Poverty is a volunteer run organization with no paid staff or

consultants. All the work we have done and are planning to do is done through financial

and in kind donations made by our volunteers and donors. We are asking individuals,

corporations and organizations to consider being sponsors of this conference and future

projects of FWOP. FWOP is presenting a unique approach to becoming a FWOP 2016

Sponsor that we hope will encourage you to step forward to help those in poverty to

have a future without poverty. FWOP is not setting a minimum donation on becoming a

sponsor of a future without poverty. We are leaving the amount up to each of you to

give what you can. Sponsors will be listed in alphabetical order in conference

publications and on our website without consideration in how much they give unless

they choose to remain anonymous.

 

If you wish to attend and/or are interested in being a financial sponsor of FWOP–

especially this conference, please register or make a donation by going to

http://www.untfwop.org/ and using our convenient donor button. Conference

Registration are $10 per student and $20 others. Also, we will have a Friday special trip

with lunch to Harvest Community. Cost of ride to Harvest: $10. Lunch: Free. If you wish

to go on the trip, you must register ahead of time. http://www.harvestlivesmart.com/.

All registrations and sponsorships will go to support the solar cooperative initiative.

Keynote speakers: Dr. Eliecer Vargas, CATIE, Costa Rica and Steve Saunders, CEO,

Texenergy Solutions.

 

Panels on: Environment, Enterprise, Education, and

Empowerment related to sustainability and poverty reduction. Workshops on: creation of

solar cooperatives and an international center for testing and training of micro

technologies for sustainable poverty reduction.

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On March - 6 - 2016 0 Comment

Future Without Poverty’s (FWOP) 2016 Conference on Reducing Global Poverty Through Grassroots Sustainable Actions will be held at the campus of the University of North Texas in Denton April 21 -23. This conference is being designed to bring together local entrepreneurs that will share their successes and vision for a future without poverty based on local business models that are economically and environmentally sustainable. FWOP expects participation from its global network of 50 affiliates representing 25 countries through the use of skype conferencing for those unable to attend in person. FWOP anticipates representatives from over 10 countries to be at the conference.

The objective of the conference is to exchange ideas, projects and to expand our growing global network for a future without poverty. This is a hands on working conference that will help plan for future projects for FWOP and to set the agenda for the 2017 Summit of the Global Coalition for a Future Without Poverty to be held in Costa Rica. We are currently accepting ideas from potential presenters and will finalize the agenda by March 1. If you are interested in being a presenter or know of someone who would be interested have them send an e-mail to tom@fwop.org.

At the conference FWOP will be unveiling its campaign to establish solar cooperatives as part of its Solar KO Poverty project. This project already has interest from affiliates in 6 countries to pilot the project in its first stage. The goal is to distribute 1,000,000 solar lights by 2019. FWOP affiliates from Africa, North America, South America, Europe and Asia will be sharing their inspiring stories about education, micro businesses, water, agriculture and energy projects that are already working or a part of their vision for a future without poverty.

A Future Without Poverty is a volunteer run organization with no paid staff or consultants. All the work we have done and are planning to do is done through financial and in kind donations made by our volunteers and donors. We are asking individuals, corporations and organizations to consider being sponsors of this conference and future projects of FWOP. FWOP is presenting a unique approach to becoming a FWOP 2016 Sponsor that we hope will encourage you to step forward to help those in poverty to have a future without poverty. FWOP is not setting a minimum donation on becoming a sponsor of a future without poverty. We are leaving the amount up to each of you to give what you can. Sponsors will be listed in alphabetical order in conference publications and on our website without consideration in how much they give unless they choose to remain anonymous.

If you are interested in being a financial sponsor of FWOP and especially this conference please contact tom@fwop.org or go to http://www.futurewithoutpoverty.org/ and make a donation using our convenient donor button. Together we can make a difference one person, one family, one community at a time.

Sometimes FWOP is asked how does the work you do make any real difference. They remind us the poor will always be with us and why do we bother. Well our answer is simple no we will never get rid of poverty for everyone but for the one we do help their life and those they touch will be changed forever. This is your opportunity to help change one or more lives for a lifetime. Please become a sponsor today. http://www.futurewithoutpoverty.org/

Registration is $10 for students and $20 for others. All registrations and sponsorships will go to support the solar cooperative initiative.  Keynote speaker: Dr. Eliecer Vargas, CATIE , Costa Rica and Steve Saunders, CEO, Texenergy Solutions.   Panels on Environment, Enterprise, Education, and Empowerment  related to sustainability and poverty reduction.  Workshops on creation of solar cooperatives and an international center for testing and training of micro technologies for sustainable poverty reduction.

Hosts: Masters in International Sustainable Tourism (MIST) and  UNT- Future Without Poverty Student Chapter.

Visit us on Facebook:

UNT Student Chapter Page

International FWOP Official Page 

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On August - 20 - 2015 0 Comment

Exquisite Logo

ExquisiteWater, Inc. is a charitable public health consulting company dedicated to providing clean water to rural and underprivileged communities around the world with plans to eventually eliminate adverse health effects caused by waterborne diseases. ExquisiteWater has officially started their first pilot in Nigeria. Their director, Amanda Sunny left for Nigeria on July 5th until the 14th to attend the very successful annual Anambra State Association World Medical Mission and Health Summit 2015. While she was there, she presented their mission for the communities in Anambra State, Nigeria to the 250+ attendees and spoke to the state’s Commissioner of Health.

Ewater3

The medical mission consisted of a group of 50 volunteers (physicians, ophthalmologists, pharmacists, nurses, and general volunteers) who traveled to six rural villages in Anambra State, Nigeria (Agbaghana, Obosi, Ihembosi, Ozubelu, and Oba) with donated prescription eyeglasses and pharmaceutical care.

In each village, the team was able to serve at least 1,500 people with a six day total of at least 9,000 people seen; including some individuals whom have never seen a doctor before in their life.

In the midst of this preliminary trip with the medical mission and health summit presentation, they were able to learn how to manage the steps needed to secure operations within a village as well as the importance of good communication. Click article to read more. 

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On July - 30 - 2015 1 Comment

Arbor Health, LLC., is an assisted living mental health facility that specializes in the mental health treatment of Veterans, with an emphasis on meaningful activities of daily living. This is a facility with very low reimbursement and had serious resident abuse problem before it was taken over by a partner of FWOP, Inc., and was very near to the Ferguson Community in St Louis where there was serious conflict and controversy.

Fie Zach is an intern at Arbor Health with a focus upon Art Therapy. He recently graduated from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago with a Master’s Degree in Art. His work focuses on sculpture, installations, video, sound and performance.

Art for soul 1

 

 

 

 

 

THE IDEA

The administrator and most of the residents are Veterans. After experiencing a severe trauma or life-threatening event, many military veterans develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). All the resident veterans in Arbor Health had PTSD and depression because of the War. The Veterans with PTSD have lived through a traumatic event that caused them to fear for their lives, see horrible things, and feel helpless. Bad memories of the traumatic event affect the rest of their life.

Mr. Zach Fie decided to create an image at the front of entrance that focuses upon about the Battle of Iwo Jima.   This was a major battle in which the U.S. Marines landed on and eventually captured the island of Iwo Jima from the Japanese Imperial  Army during World War II.  This is an attempt to reflect and to give Veterans a peaceful lovely home to live.

Fei Zach believes art is a reflection of human creative skill and imagination.  Picasso once said: “Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.” He believes that art making itself is  therapeutic, it transcends words and triggers different parts of the brain and subconscious.  When he realized that art was such a powerful tool for helping people,  he decided to enter the healthcare field as an informal therapist  and use his art skills for the benefit of people.

CURRENT WORK DESCRIPTION

The four soldiers are painted with Acrylic and one is soldier holding an American flag. There are 5 US military badges (US Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard) and 6 main war country maps (German, Korea, Saudi Arabia, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan) around the soldiers. For various countries, the newspaper clippings reported the events of each battlefield stories are integrated into the mural as well as the honor military ribbons which are made of wood.

Art for the Soul 1

 

 

 

 

 

PATIENT REPORT

A specific resident he worked with had a serious PTSD and depression conditions. An angry man and full of an attitude problem, a big smoker, always walking around and talking to himself. People think he is a really talented guy.  He likes to draw a lot and is really interested in painting.   Unfortunately, the veteran never had chance to go school. After Fei Zach talked to him, he has shown a lot of his sketches and explain and the stories behind his drawings.

The veteran told Fie Zach that he always can hear some sort of “noise talk” which makes him angry and gives him a headache.

RESIDENTS REACTION

When Fie Zachstart  was working  on the mural most residents just passed by and looked at it as weird. They had no idea what we were doing, but when the image gradually showed through a lot of veterans and residents came over ask us about the work and some then began to also share their own military experience Zach.

CONCLUSION

Zach believes that art is an amazing gift from God to human beings,  and Art Therapy is about the process of “art making” rather than the project itself. Art therapy is such a power tool and healing modality intended to bring together physical, emotional and spiritual care by facilitating creative ways for patients to respond to their experiences. In addition Arbor Health is slowly adding a wide range of activities to improve the social and psychological environment in the facility, e.g., gardening, fishing, pool table, dart board, ceramics,  foosball,  ping pong, and  music.

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On May - 26 - 2015 0 Comment

For the past 15 years, A Future Without Poverty (FWOP) has worked to build a network of individuals, institutions, community organizations, foundations, religious organizations, international non-government organizations, corporations and government agencies to join in its mission to reduce global poverty. These 15 years have provided us the opportunity to learn first-hand about the many activities that are being done to attempt to reduce global poverty.

All of these experiences have guided FWOP to the following conclusion:

There is a need to form a global coalition committed to promoting local solutions to reduce poverty that are economically and environmentally sustainable.

FWOP has found many examples of successful efforts to reduce poverty in communities around the world. In most cases the programs that have been successful are initiated by local entrepreneurs and assisted by outside resources that offer an investment in the program and work with local leadership to meet their dreams for a future without poverty.

The Coalition for A Future Without Poverty will encourage all levels of the global community to share ideas and work collectively to find locally based solutions that are economically and environmentally sustainable. FWOP will spend the next 12 months asking individuals, institutions, community organizations, foundations, religious organizations, international non-government organizations, corporations and government agencies to join the coalition to reduce global poverty.

FWOP will collect success stories from individuals in communities around the globe and share them through our website and other social media. This will help the global community to identify those common denominators that are identified by those who are reducing their life of poverty.

If you are involved with, or aware of, a program that we should review for inclusion in our global list of local success stories please send the following information to: tom@fwop.org

Contact person’s name:

Email:

Country:

Community:

Brief description of program:

 

From all us at FWOP, thank you.

Tom Benjamin

Executive Director of A Future Without Poverty, Inc.

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