Sustainable Community Initiatives

An indirect route to build more sustainable communities through schools, is the thesis or question. Two of our partner schools in Guadalajara, Mexico are working to address this issue and ...

SuBire and CUM practicing sustainable gardening.

Work Is Underway On The Ripley Community Garden

Located one hour east of Cincinnati is the Historic Village of Ripley, Ohio.  This village of 1,800 people was a major player in the Underground Railroad.  The homes of abolitionists ...

The rough and tumble bunch of gardeners!

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FWOP Membership is free to anyone who believes that every person in the world has the right to have a life without poverty. If you believe that everyone should have the ...

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Because everybody deserves a future without poverty. FWOP is a 501 (c) 3 non- profit tax exempt organization.

Posted by Miguel Juanez On October - 31 - 2014 0 Comment

POVERTY, CORRUPTION AND SUSTAINABILITY: EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABILITY

By Stan Ingman, PhD.

Introduction

When we review the challenges we all face around the globe, we can identify at least three major issues to be addressed in the 21st Century: Poverty, Corruption and Sustainability. Some call for retreat into “gated” neighborhoods or national borders. With our dependence on energy and consumption of products to live from around the world, total isolation or independence is not likely to be a functional strategy for survival. It seems clear that few borders function very well. Witness how porous the USA/ Mexico, or the Africa/ Europe borders are to prevent immigration. Gated communities in Mexico and USA may reduce kidnapping and violent attacks of the elites, but elites do not like to avoid contact with the rest of the world and it is not a possible solution for 90% of the population.

As we see locally some upper class families from Mexico, Africa, Asia, Middle East, Russia, China, Central America and South America are moving to USA or Europe to protect their families and themselves. To avoid China, Mexico or other nations, you can buy your way into USA for some $50,000. Cities like Dallas send officials to various cities of Mexico attempting to attract Mexican citizens to come north as an economic development strategy for Dallas. Attracting foreigners to St Louis is a strategy to build up their economy. Chinese nationals have used 85% of the 10,667 visas under the US program. (Shyong, 2014 )

This essay attempts to argue that there are few short term solutions to reducing this poverty and corruption, which in turn, would reduce terrorism, violence and difficult migration across national borders. Most indexes seem to indicate an increase in the side effects of poverty and corruption around the world. The World Fact Book published by the Central Intelligence Agency reports that terrorism has been increasing every year since 2001. (www.indexmundi.com) Huffington Post reports terrorism attacks have more than quadrupled since 2001.

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On August - 29 - 2014 0 Comment
SuBire and CUM practicing sustainable gardening.

An indirect route to build more sustainable communities through schools, is the thesis or question. Two of our partner schools in Guadalajara, Mexico are working to address this issue and build better communities. (www.SuBire.mx and www.colegiounionmexico.com ) One of those schools is SuBire, who in the last few years has demonstrated to parents and students how to create an “energy efficient” school–or by implication– energy efficient homes and businesses.

Solar panels atop subire

In 2013, they installed one hundred 250 watt solar panels, furthermore they installed another 100 panels in 2014 over the school’s parking lot. They estimate that 25% of the $5,000 monthly bill will be covered by solar power and that the system should be paid off in five years.

Solar panels atop school

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On June - 10 - 2014 0 Comment
The rough and tumble bunch of gardeners!

Located one hour east of Cincinnati is the Historic Village of Ripley, Ohio.  This village of 1,800 people was a major player in the Underground Railroad.  The homes of abolitionists Rev. John Rankin and John P. Parker are located close to the Ohio River which was the dividing line between freedom and slavery.  Eliza of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” fame crossed the Ohio River in Ripley on her way to freedom.

The  majestic view from atop one of the village landmarks.

The majestic view from atop the John Rankin House

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On February - 22 - 2012 0 Comment
Join A Future Without Poverty

A Future Without Poverty LogoFWOP Membership is free to anyone who believes that every person in the world has the right to have a life without poverty. If you believe that everyone should have the opportunity of adequate food and shelter you should join our Global Electronic FWOP Network. Together in solidarity we will speak out for the rights of the poor and organize chapters around the world to give voice, self-respect, and hope to the poorest of the poor.

Membership is free, but if you can afford to make a donation of any amount, it will help cover the expense of creating this network.

To make a donation, click on the Donate Button on the right sidebar.

 

Join A Future Without Poverty Today!

Are you a part of those that feel it is time to take a stand against hunger, homelessness and the ravages of modern day poverty? By signing up to join our Global Electronic FWOP Network you are telling the world leaders that we need an end to the suffering caused by the uneven distribution of the global resources.

To join, please enter your email address on text box to the right or click here. Thank you!

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On November - 9 - 2011 0 Comment
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Kendall Brune , PhD Director of Economic Development for FWOP has been involved in developing an exciting effort in St Louis.

Hundreds of volunteers (424 Volunteers) worked with Rebuild Together-St. Louis to transform a north St. Louis building into a training center for military veterans.

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On October - 15 - 2011 1 Comment

San Martin and Mazamitla, Mexico : Self Management and New Low Income Eco-Housing

For some 8 years FWOP have worked with San Martin to make this small settlement more livable. Initially, a gasoline generator from Texas was installed to supply two light bulbs per 10 houses. Later three solar panels were installed to substitute for the generator. Now they use them both. A TV antenna show that someone now watches TV.

Villagers had to walk mile or two to locate a bucket of water. So , our team located a spring some 2 miles away from San Martin. GPS help us determine it higher than San Martin. A gravity system of pipes pushed the water tank to San Martin, and finally lines to each house per water access.

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On September - 23 - 2011 0 Comment

While it may be unfair to put the world’s troubles on the backs of women of the world, it is instructive to review the roles of women with respect to national and community building across our planet. Stereotypes are not always helpful.

National leadership in the hands of women does seem to be on the rise, e.g., Germany , Brazil, Argentina, Thailand and Australia. Their impact is as yet unclear. More impressive is the role of Aung San Suu Kyi , leader of the opposition in Burma.

Perhaps more concrete social change is the work of Dr. Yunus and the creation of the Grameen Bank, which focuses upon micro loans to mostly women in Bangladesh and around the world. In Mexico FWOP has tried to support En Via Foundation in Oaxaca that provides microloans to women in two villages. (www.envia.org ) .

The Green Belt Movement that was organized by Professor Wangari Masthai , Nobel Prize for Peace in 2004 has been empowering women for thirty years across Kenya and Africa. Their goals is now one billion tree campaign . Turk Pipkin is recent film Nobeity focuses in part on her outstanding work. ( www.greenbeltmovement.org )

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On September - 23 - 2011 0 Comment
Destination Mexico Powerpoint

Destination Mexico: Aging and Emerging Societies,
Spring Break 2009

Mexico Powerpoint Presentaion

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On September - 12 - 2011 0 Comment

Sha a ‘Adu : Mujeres Vigilantes’ s housing project in Hidalgo State

The Mujeres Vigilantes recently inaugurated a tourist complex on a large recreational lake in State of Hidalgo.

The name of the project is, Sha a’ Aud, was inspired by the “kibbutzin” communities of Israel. The idea behind the project was to combine a community for native or indigenous families with a special business foucs for village men and women to secure a living.

Lic. Ivonne Solis Sandoval, President of Mujeres Vigilantes , came up with idea while visiting Israel on trade mission. Ms Sandoval brought together SAGARPA(Agriculture) , SRA (Agarian Reform) and SEDESOL (Community and Economic Development) from Federal Government to fund the project. The first youtube celebrates the opening of the project.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhZ_Us9Pnxg

The project is located near Zimapan in northwest region of the State of Hidalgo. Some 1500 employees will have work that is related to this lake retreat. Zimapan is easily accessible from Mexico City. The next youtube shows the cabanas, the lake and the initial construction of the homes (200) for the workers at the resort.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-w1PmpvO4gQ

Finally, Lic. Ivonne Sandoval explains the reason for the project in the youtube below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=0KRJmHEA6Ns

Future Without Poverty, Inc. is proud to be a partner with Mujeres Vigilantes and to be a witness of their numerous accomplisments in Mexico. New homes have been built in Sahuayo near Lake Chapala. They started building their network and organization in 2004.

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On August - 7 - 2011 0 Comment

As the gap in the USA between haves and have nots, rich and poor, widens while the overall economy growth also slows, and the wealth gap between various white and non-white expands, does localism provide any hope?

Sarah Sanka’s books on the Not So Big House and Not So Big Life provides one survival option and even a potential solution to avoid economic tragedy and increase life satisfaction. (www.susanka.com) How to protect family life from national economic depression? Children moving back home and merging resources is one concrete step being taken every day in Texas, Ohio and Michigan.

In the 30s USA created the Works Progress Administration (WPA) program as a way to put people to work and earn enough to live.

http://eh.net/encyclopedia/articlecouch.works.progress.administration

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