A Call for a 2017 Summit of the Global Coalition for a Future Without Poverty

For the past 15 years, A Future Without Poverty (FWOP) has worked to build a network of individuals, institutions, community organizations, foundations, religious organizations, international non-government organizations, corporations and government ...

Help us create a future without poverty.

Ripley’s Gourmet Tortillas Coming Soon – Summer 2015

A Future Without Poverty, Inc (FWOP) is proud to announce that Ripley’s Gourmet Tortillas will soon begin making all natural tortillas, chips, spices, and salsas in the historic river town ...

Team RGTF

FWOP Members Attend UNT Conference and Inspire Two New Student Chapters

Emily Medina, President of the University of North Texas (UNT) chapter of A Future Without Poverty (FWOP), and Stan Ingman, Vice President of the FWOP Board, attended a conference titled, “Education and Culture: ...

WIll be establishing student chapters at their respective schools.

Because everybody deserves a future without poverty. FWOP is a 501 (c) 3 non- profit tax exempt organization.

Posted by Miguel Juanez On May - 26 - 2015 0 Comment
Help us create a future without poverty.

For the past 15 years, A Future Without Poverty (FWOP) has worked to build a network of individuals, institutions, community organizations, foundations, religious organizations, international non-government organizations, corporations and government agencies to join in its mission to reduce global poverty. These 15 years have provided us the opportunity to learn first-hand about the many activities that are being done to attempt to reduce global poverty.

All of these experiences have guided FWOP to the following conclusion:

There is a need to form a global coalition committed to promoting local solutions to reduce poverty that are economically and environmentally sustainable.

FWOP has found many examples of successful efforts to reduce poverty in communities around the world. In most cases the programs that have been successful are initiated by local entrepreneurs and assisted by outside resources that offer an investment in the program and work with local leadership to meet their dreams for a future without poverty.

The Coalition for A Future Without Poverty will encourage all levels of the global community to share ideas and work collectively to find locally based solutions that are economically and environmentally sustainable. FWOP will spend the next 12 months asking individuals, institutions, community organizations, foundations, religious organizations, international non-government organizations, corporations and government agencies to join the coalition to reduce global poverty.

FWOP will collect success stories from individuals in communities around the globe and share them through our website and other social media. This will help the global community to identify those common denominators that are identified by those who are reducing their life of poverty.

If you are involved with, or aware of, a program that we should review for inclusion in our global list of local success stories please send the following information to: tom@fwop.org

Contact person’s name:

Email:

Country:

Community:

Brief description of program:

 

From all us at FWOP, thank you.

Tom Benjamin

Executive Director of A Future Without Poverty, Inc.

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On May - 21 - 2015 0 Comment
Team RGTF

A Future Without Poverty, Inc (FWOP) is proud to announce that Ripley’s Gourmet Tortillas will soon begin making all natural tortillas, chips, spices, and salsas in the historic river town of Ripley, Ohio.  The highly anticipated community-focused business venture aims to show how FWOP’s 4 E’s model of community renewal (Enterprise, Education, Environment, and Empowerment) can be adapted anywhere to create jobs, promote education, improve the environment, and most importantly—empower the local community of Ripley.  To receive updates on the progress of this and other FWOP projects from around the globe, sign up for a free FWOP membership. Simply enter your email and click subscribe.

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On May - 4 - 2015 0 Comment
WIll be establishing student chapters at their respective schools.

Emily Medina, President of the University of North Texas (UNT) chapter of A Future Without Poverty (FWOP), and Stan Ingman, Vice President of the FWOP Board, attended a conference titled, “Education and Culture: Cross-Border Challenges and Opportunities” this past May 1st.  This conference is one of many initiatives made possible by an MOU signed back in 2001 between the university and Secretary of Education of Jalisco, Mexico.

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On May - 1 - 2015 0 Comment
Education is a key out of poverty and a key part of our 4 E's model

Some thirty thousand retirees have settled on the north side of Lake Chapala, south of Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico.  They come from Europe, Canada, USA and it is claimed that their economic impact on the area is more important than all the agricultural production from Mexico City to Guadalajara.  As they attempt to design a meaningful retirement, many become community development activists in the surrounding municipalities of Lake Chapala, Ajijic and Jocotepec.  The Ajijic Rotary Club and related organizations come together to raise funds.  The Tepehua Centro, which is a barrio north of Chapala, is the focus of some significant development efforts.  A small team from the Denton Rotary club visited them in October and in April to assess what might be the next steps to support the effort in the Tepehua Centro.  Rotary Clubs in Denton, Arlington and Flower Mound provided $5000 for pharmacy supplies in April 2015.  Future Without Poverty (FWOP) students at the University of North Texas( UNT) chapter provided $500 to repair one house in the barrio in 2014.  

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On January - 14 - 2015 0 Comment

Our friends at the University of North Texas, via Prof. Dr. Stan Ingman, have allowed us to post their forum schedule happening January 14 – 16, 2015 at the University of North Texas. Email us at fwop@fwop.org if you have any questions about the program and write “UNT International forum 2015″ in the subject line.

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On January - 11 - 2015 0 Comment

Recently a team, Kathy Langley, Nichola Driver, Iftekhar Amin and Stan Ingman traveled to Guadalajara Mexico. With partners in Mexico, some significant poverty reduction programs were visited. In additions, we visited educational efforts that show students how sustainability planning can promote poverty reduction and some future plans emerged on the trip for future partnerships.

Our team visited CUM ( www.colegiounionmexico.com ) a K to 12 school in northwest Guadalajara. Families who send their children have incomes that range from $1000 to 2000 per month and pay under $180 per month for their children to attend CUM. We conducted a focus group with the parents to explore how they could develop their neighborhoods to support more sustainable living (socially, economically and environmentally). We made plans for a second community survey on needs and planning; the new survey will be sent out in 2015. Below was performance on October 31, 2014 for Day of the Dead on November 1st. All memorials for the Day of the Dead were done with recycled materials.

performance at campus!

performance at campus!

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On October - 31 - 2014 0 Comment

POVERTY, CORRUPTION AND SUSTAINABILITY: EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABILITY

By Stan Ingman, PhD.

Introduction

When we review the challenges we all face around the globe, we can identify at least three major issues to be addressed in the 21st Century: Poverty, Corruption and Sustainability. Some call for retreat into “gated” neighborhoods or national borders. With our dependence on energy and consumption of products to live from around the world, total isolation or independence is not likely to be a functional strategy for survival. It seems clear that few borders function very well. Witness how porous the USA/ Mexico, or the Africa/ Europe borders are to prevent immigration. Gated communities in Mexico and USA may reduce kidnapping and violent attacks of the elites, but elites do not like to avoid contact with the rest of the world and it is not a possible solution for 90% of the population.

As we see locally some upper class families from Mexico, Africa, Asia, Middle East, Russia, China, Central America and South America are moving to USA or Europe to protect their families and themselves. To avoid China, Mexico or other nations, you can buy your way into USA for some $50,000. Cities like Dallas send officials to various cities of Mexico attempting to attract Mexican citizens to come north as an economic development strategy for Dallas. Attracting foreigners to St Louis is a strategy to build up their economy. Chinese nationals have used 85% of the 10,667 visas under the US program. (Shyong, 2014 )

This essay attempts to argue that there are few short term solutions to reducing this poverty and corruption, which in turn, would reduce terrorism, violence and difficult migration across national borders. Most indexes seem to indicate an increase in the side effects of poverty and corruption around the world. The World Fact Book published by the Central Intelligence Agency reports that terrorism has been increasing every year since 2001. (www.indexmundi.com) Huffington Post reports terrorism attacks have more than quadrupled since 2001.

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On August - 29 - 2014 0 Comment
SuBire and CUM practicing sustainable gardening.

An indirect route to build more sustainable communities through schools, is the thesis or question. Two of our partner schools in Guadalajara, Mexico are working to address this issue and build better communities. (www.SuBire.mx and www.colegiounionmexico.com ) One of those schools is SuBire, who in the last few years has demonstrated to parents and students how to create an “energy efficient” school–or by implication– energy efficient homes and businesses.

Solar panels atop subire

In 2013, they installed one hundred 250 watt solar panels, furthermore they installed another 100 panels in 2014 over the school’s parking lot. They estimate that 25% of the $5,000 monthly bill will be covered by solar power and that the system should be paid off in five years.

Solar panels atop school

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Posted by Miguel Juanez On June - 10 - 2014 0 Comment
The rough and tumble bunch of gardeners!

Located one hour east of Cincinnati is the Historic Village of Ripley, Ohio.  This village of 1,800 people was a major player in the Underground Railroad.  The homes of abolitionists Rev. John Rankin and John P. Parker are located close to the Ohio River which was the dividing line between freedom and slavery.  Eliza of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” fame crossed the Ohio River in Ripley on her way to freedom.

The  majestic view from atop one of the village landmarks.

The majestic view from atop the John Rankin House

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Posted by Future Without Poverty On February - 22 - 2012 0 Comment

FWOP LogoFWOP Membership is free to anyone who believes that every person in the world has the right to have a life without poverty. As a result, we are launching our Global Electronic FWOP Network.

As a member, you will receive a monthly newsletter and updates highlighting the ways you can get involved and what other members are doing to make their communities resilient. Both locally and around the world.

There are no dues or fees to join. However, if you can afford to make a donation of any amount, it will help cover the expense of creating this network.

To make a donation, click on the Donate Button on the right sidebar.

 

Join A Future Without Poverty Today!

Are you a part of those that feel it is time to take a stand against hunger, homelessness and the ravages of modern day poverty? By signing up to join our Global Electronic FWOP Network you are telling the world leaders that we need an end to the suffering caused by the uneven distribution of the global resources.

 

Stay tuned for our 2017 Summit of the Global Coalition.

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